Milan has more to offer than just the fashion week where world brands like Prada and Dolce & Gabbana will be shown. Good food and nice buildings are enough to find in Milan! Below we have some things you definitely need to see during your visit in Milan. Cimitero Monumentale This cemetery is located north of the center of Milan and was designed by architect Carlo Maciachini.

There are monumental tombs in the form of Greek temples, obelisks and buildings in Tuscan and Venetian style and rather bombastic monuments, some with a particular history such as that of Maria Maggi, in reality, Eva Perón.. It was a privilege to be buried here. Special is the grave of one María Maggi. This was the grave of Eva Perón between 1957 and 1971 in the tomb. Eva was the wife of Argentine president Juan Perón in 1955, who was deposed in a military coup.

Because the soldiers were afraid that the body of Eva would be a symbol of Peronism, they released her corpse to Milan where she was buried under a false name. Eva Perón is buried now in Argentina after many wanderings. Santa Maria delle Grazie The Santa Maria delle Grazie (a former Dominican Monastery) is best known for one of the most famous works of art by Leonardo da Vinci: the last supper. That work of art in the dining room is often called a fresco, although it not the official painting. Da Vinci painted the last supper on a dry wall rather than on wet plaster. That technique did the painting no good, shortly after the completion (in 1498) continued to persistency. Then it got further damaged by failed restorations, pollution and – during the second world war – a bomb. The last restoration was completed in 1999. Duomo Santa Maria Nascente It cost centuries to finish the Milan Cathedral but now it is beautiful and finished. This Gothic church is the eyecatcher of the city with 135 marble ornamental turrets and over 2200 images. The rooftop terrace offers a beautiful view over Milan.

The oldest part of this large Gothic church is the apse, with three superb Lancet. On both sides of the altar you see beautifully crafted portals leading to the sacristy. The decorations of the arches of these portals date from the 14th century. Also the stained-glass Windows in the side aisles is not to be missed. A visit to the roof terrace should not be forgotten. You can choose the stairs (500 steps) or the elevator. The rooftop terrace is decorated with marble pinnacles and you have a nice view over Milan, at least most of the time. Sometimes the view is obstructed by the air pollution above Milan. Teatro alla Scala Even if you don’t like Opera a visit to La Scala is more than worth it.

The Interior of the building is more like a cathedral than a concert hall. It was built on the site of a church, Santa Maria delle Scala, between 1775 and 1778. Verdi established here his fame as well as Maria Callas. It is not easy to get hold of a ticket for a show at the most famous opera house in the world. If that fails, you can always visit the adjacent museum with a fine collection of musical instruments, posters and costumes.

Museo Nazionale della Scienza e della Tecnica The National Museum of science and technology in Milan is one of the most important museums in the world in this area. The development of the steam engine, the invention of the radio by Marconi, beautiful old locomotives, old globes with the routes of explorers and many more can be seen in this museum. A restaurant in a tram This area is known amongst citizens as a location for occasions and entertainment.

Three different menus are offered (meat, fish and vegetarian), specially created by globally renowned chefs and boosted with conventional Milanese meals. La Bettola di Piero “It’s like eating at your grandmother’s house”. This restaurant offers conventional Italian cuisine and the very best treats in the area. His best dish is le uova al tegamino with asparagus, which his Nonna made use of to make for him.